VALENCELL IN THE NEWS

The Bloomberg Advantage: Featuring Dr. Steven LeBoeuf
The Bloomberg Advantage: Featuring Dr. Steven LeBoeuf

May 8, 2015Dr. Steven LeBoeuf speaks with The Bloomberg Advantage about the importance of accuracy in wearable technology and the increase in adoption the Company is seeing in its PerformTek license partners. Read More

Inked and irked: Apple Watch users report tattoo problems
Inked and irked: Apple Watch users report tattoo problems

May 3, 2015 — It’s an annoying problem for an unlucky few: The Apple Watch’s heart rate monitor might not work if you have a tattoo on your wrist. Inked and irked Apple fans have dubbed the issue “TattooGate” on Twitter, complaining that they must choose between their body art and their stylish gadget.  The issue comes down to light, said Steven LeBoeuf, president of Valencell, which develops biometric sensor technology — though not specifically for the Apple Watch. Read More

Dark tattoos on wrist block Apple Watch sensor light, say complaints
Dark tattoos on wrist block Apple Watch sensor light, say complaints

May 1, 2015 — The darker the ink and the deeper the tattoo, the more problems will occur. Well, that inks. The newly released Apple Watch may be problematic for people with dark tattoos on their wrist, the company acknowledged after complaints from customers. Read More

Apple Watch has a problem with tattoos
Apple Watch has a problem with tattoos

May 1, 2015 — "The signal to noise ratio when you use light to try and measure blood flow in people as Apple is doing is much lower in someone who has high melanin content," says Steven LeBoeuf, a co-founder of Valencell, a producer of biometric sensors. His company hasn't completed its tests with the Apple Watch. Read More

And then there was TattooGate.
And then there was TattooGate.

May 1, 2015 — Social media is all abuzz with anecdotes and posts on Reddit and Twitter that the Apple Watch sensor that measures heart rate does not work well on some users that have tattoos on their wrists. "Doubt they asked at checkout if you had any tattoos. ... It's all about da money yo," tweeted Kayla Sweeney. Read More

Why the Apple Watch Might Not Work for Everybody
Why the Apple Watch Might Not Work for Everybody

May 1, 2015 —   The Apple Watch is designed to automatically detect when it’s on your wrist so that you can receive notifications, access the watch’s functions, and track your heart rate. But Apple fans who already have an Apple Watch in hand — or on their wrist — report that the watch doesn’t always work properly on tattooed skin. Read More

Apple Watch has a problem with tattoos
Apple Watch has a problem with tattoos

May 1, 2015 — And then there was TattooGate. Social media is all abuzz with anecdotes and posts on Reddit and Twitter that the Apple Watch sensor that measures heart rate does not work well on some users that have tattoos on their wrists. "Doubt they asked at checkout if you had any tattoos. ... It's all about da money yo," tweeted Kayla Sweeney. "It turns out you must choose between a wrist tattoo and an #AppleWatch," tweeted Steve Burgess. In fact, the issue has some merit. While not commenting specifically on the reports, Apple directed USA Today to its website. Read More

Tattooed wrists can stop wearables like the Apple Watch working
Tattooed wrists can stop wearables like the Apple Watch working

May 1, 2015 — The long-awaited Apple Watch isn't working for some users - because of their tattoos. People with inked wrists who've paid up to £13,500 (we can't quite cope with that figure, either) for the smart watch are complaining on social media. Perhaps surprisingly, it's not news to Apple. "Permanent or temporary changes to your skin, such as some tattoos, can also impact heart rate sensor performance," it says on the firm's website. Read More

Whoops: Apple Watch may not work for black people
Whoops: Apple Watch may not work for black people

April 30, 2015 — Early adopters first appeared on Reddit complaining about the issue on April 28. The Apple Watch locks and requires a passcode for use if it doesn't detect contact with your skin, and new users are finding that tattoos and dark skin might be tricking the watches into believe that there isn't any skin contact, according to a Quartz report. Valencell, which makes the heart monitor sensors used by companies that make wearables, said in the report that this is correct, and the sensors on its beam a green light onto the skin that penetrates the first layers of skin and measures bloodflow. However, the ink of tattoos often absorbs this green light. Read More

People with tattoos report the Apple Watch is having trouble determining they are alive
People with tattoos report the Apple Watch is having trouble determining they are alive

April 30, 2015 — . . . Steven LeBoeuf, a mechanical engineer scientist and the co-founder of Valencell, a company that supplies biometric sensors to wearable companies such as Jabra and Scosche, tells Quartz that Reddit’s theory is correct. Apple, like many wearable manufacturers, uses sensors that beam green light toward the skin. It penetrates through the first few layers of skin and measures the rate of bloodflow in the capillaries sitting below the surface. Green light, however, is absorbed by the ink used in most tattoos. Read More

Pages